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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair will now recognizes the gentleman from california, for five minutes. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. i join my colleagues here in congress from both sides of the aisle to call for the end to the war in afghanistan. after more than a decade of war, with now more than ,000 lives lost, and hundreds of millions of american tax dollars spent, it's time for our troops to come home to their families. i represent the military communities of travis air force base and come january i will represent the community of beale air force base as well. i can tell you from firsthand experience that the men and women who serve in our nation's military and their families are america's finest. they are not afraid of sacrifice . they joined the armed forces because they love our country and they are willing to give everything to keep our nation safe. but their sacrifice must be for a reason. if we are going to ask them to risk life and limb on the other side of the world, it must be for a mission that is vital to our nation's security. we can no longer say t
a record turn out in california. the secretary of state says many precincts reporting a high volume of voters. 18 million people registered to vote for the election. that is a state record. half of those plan to vote by mail.uu=÷ >> really interesting to see such a large turn out in polling places because i'm also suspecting that we're going to have largest vote by mail turn out in the history of the state. >> that is a big achievement considering only 31% of the eligible voters took part in the june primary. many voters dropped off ballot was out leaving their cars. san jose's most watched race is measure did. california schools banking on prop 30, governor jerry brown proposed that plan, today voted for it. people in oakland greeted him in the oakland hills, proposition 30 raises money for public schools and community colleges and temporarily add a quarter cent tax to state sales tax and raise taxes for californians earning more than $250,000 a year. opponents say it's too expensive. here is a look at propositions. prop 32 preventing unions from deducting money from paychecks to
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
, there are two in arizona that have yet to be called, 3 in california, 1 in north carolina, and one in florida. these have not been called because ballots are still being counted. mostly overseas and military balance, some early voting, especially in arizona. that is what is still being counted. host: are any of these expected to go to a recount? is it just provisional ballots and absentee ballots? guest: i think a couple will go to recounts. the closest, i believe, is in california in the seventh district. i think that will definitely be going to a recount. also in north carolina, the margin is 400 votes in a race with mike macentire. another is inlflorid awhere allen west is behind by 2400 votes. i think c-span viewers are familiar with him and knows he is not somebody that gives up easily. host: what would be the biggest upset from your perspective from the stresses that have not been called? guest: i think the biggest upset would be the race in arizona's second district which is where ron barber is the incumbent. host: that is the aide to former congressman gabby gifford. guest: this was h
and california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail. possibly in hopes of being able to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still counting a lot of districts, but we have seen eight or nine competitive seats with a very interesting st
battleground states. millions of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we planned for, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same percent of the electorate as in 2008. we got 65% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, voting rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battleground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino vote since 19
. southern california you are looking good. much of the four corners looking good as well. take a look at your first alert forecast for the day today. the nice conditions will continue. we will see a ton of sunshine all around the northeast. cool temperatures but still a little bit warmer than you were yesterday. down to the southeast, also looking pretty good except the coastal areas of florida. by tonight see some rain moving into coastal areas. >> coming up on the show we are weeks away from going over that fiscal cliff. so does the president's tax math add up? a look at the numbers. >> now that marijuana is legal both colorado and washington, d.c. state. will police be able to keep stoned drivers off the roads? we have that legal debate coming up. [ female announcer ] want to spend less and retire with more? at e-trade, our free online tools and retirement specialists can help you build a personalized plan and execute it with a wide range of low cost investments. get a great plan and low cost investments at e-trade. [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where you don't back dow
, we don't know what is going to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home in napa valley was broken into on monday. so, she actually has some little housekeeping to take care of. apparently people broken. they don't know what is missing. sort of this bizarre thing. in the event he does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the subtext -- almost a shakespearean subtext -- between steny hoyer and nancy pelosi, they have in turn together on capitol hill in the 1960's and they have been rivals for years. the last 10 or 12 years, competing for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is trying to live up somebody who she -- who would be her successor of choice. there is a lot of trauma and we just don't know where the dominoes will fall until we know her intentions. it >> just to wrap up -- who is in the next generation of would- be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement or if not
will be seen in retrospect as something close to the proposition in california. incredibly shortsighted with long-term consequences. whatever those republican governors and legislators thought they were doing, every latino population in the country and thought not only are you not competing for are revoked, you do not want our vote to. the gop is not even getting up to have argument about policies of this point. there is this time of tremendous identity of -- how often do you go to church? there is the identity politics. our system is frozen with the two out of three close presidential elections happening. >> right here. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking a
but actually you can't tell the total number of votes in the nation until california gets around to doing it. you know, some states count them very clean and don't seem to have any problem. >> megyn: how about virginia? is that true of virginia. >> virginia, that has been true. when george allen was defeated for senator six years ago by 6,000 or 7,000 votes, virginia went right down, you know, they went back over that, i believe there was recount or reexpectation of the vote, less than 100 votes changed. it was pretty straightforward. new hampshire is famous for doing that well, too and so forth. other states have had bigger problems. >> bret: we should point out if we put that back up. that was the national popular vote total. that will pop up throughout the night as well. you will see the actual vote total through the night. these are all the states throughout the nation and there you see it as it continues to tick up and for us, after the iowa caucuses, the difference was added, 61256 right now so i don't have to pull out the calculator. >> megyn: didn't you get yelled at by math teacher
states, california, nevada and florida, have already made self-driving vehicles legal as long as the human's sitting in the driver's seat in case of a emergency. that's a good idea. meanwhile, these cars could lose worker productivity. the average commuter spends 250 hours a year behind the wheel. or they could come in handy after you've had a couple cocktails. self-driving trucks could transform the trucking industry. picture long lines of self-driving 18-wheelers traveling down the highway just a few inches apart, no drivers, no stops for gas or food, it could boost fuel efficiency as much as 20%. we're going to need to keep driving ourselves though for a while longer. experts say the driverless cars should be more common in another ten to 15 years when the costs come down. here's the question, how would you feel about riding in a car that drives itself? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile, post a comment on my blog. or go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i don't know if i'd trust a car to drive itself. >> me either. i wouldn't feel good about it at all, jack. n
votes right now in california. when they meet this will be on the agenda and should be on the agenda. remember two ways to disinfranchise people. we want that. and another way to be disinfranchised someone who shouldn't be voting cancelled your vote out. >> the book who's counting and how they put your vote at risk. thank you, john. >> gretchen: how many of you think you are better off now than four years ago. stunning worry from the exit polls. on works for president obama. and he's up next . ♪ >> tonight, more than 200 yearrs after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the path of perfecting our union moves forward. begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robituss
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
not hard hit, or some as far away as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment, crews, et cetera, into new jersey. we were able to get c-17's, c- 130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel, to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure. for that, we have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people ge
to try to put more women in congress across the country. i am proud that in california our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators. women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our members are great here, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator elapsed tammy baldwin [applause] senator idiolect maisie toronto. hirono. only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. that is very exciting. unfortunately we do not have kathy hochul this next congress, but the future is soon coming upon -- we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. we are still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success -- as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states? the house democratic women? because this is where the hopes and dreams of american families are. they may not know that, they may not know one party from the next and the rest, but we now that without roza deluaro we w
california where four men were planning to join al qaeda. the suspects are accused of planning to bomb targets overseas and here at home. if convicted, the defendants could each face 15 years in prison. >>> and "usa today," a study finds people out of work at some point in their career are more likely to have a heart attack after the age of 50. researchers believe individuals laid off or fired are more likely to be at risk than those who left their jobs voluntarily. and mika, you talk about this all the time. the physical impact -- >> and mental. >> that unemployment has because of the middle income. >> on entire families. >> the "los angeles times," humans may not be the only species to experience a midlife crisis. a new study of over 300 chimpanzees and 170 orangutans finds they also suffer -- >> and willie was talking to me about this. >> oh, willie, you're too young. >> he did. >> i've got a guy. >> apparently they suffer from a dip in happiness around their mid lives. midlife point of their life span. the study provides new insight suggesting the midlife crisis is driven by biolog
was the florida card. the assumption since 2000 was you have to win florida. california, new york are no longer in play. for republicans you have to win texas and florida to move forward. >> a call to make here. the state of massachusetts the senate race much talked about for months on end in massachusetts, the first woman his to win an office of t kind in the state of massachusetts and "fox news" projects it is a done deal. this is a gain for the democrats and a loss for the republicans. elizabeth warren has beaten scott brown knocks news state of for the massachusetts. a democratic strategist, how did this happen. >> there was no outside money and an $80 million race. she became a good candidate r time. she helped tremendously was helped by the convention in charlotte as many democrats were and the debates. scott brown hurt himself badly in the debates. he came off as someone they didn't recognize. angry and defensive. huge win for massachusetts. barnd.elloo i'm jeff barnn. pilbert. fox45 is youu home ll nighh with vote 2012. 2012. we bringing you up to the minutes resslls on the ttree ball
good morning, blythe danner. hi, blythe danner. >> that's very nice. i'm out in california right now. it is early for me. how are you doing? >> stephanie: i'm good. i know i spoke to you on the red carpet once somewhere and i spoke to your daughter, gwyneth paltrow and i said you'll never know who i interviewed. blythe danner. she went along with the joke. >> i'm very happy. i came to fame as being gwyneth's mom which is fine with me. >> stephanie: and much more. how are things out on the campaign trail. why are you so motivated this time around? >> so excited. out connecting with people. listening to what they had to say about how they are -- their kids have been working so hard. i can't get over the kids -- the field offices and they're so smart and they've just got -- they were such a big help to me. i think first as a woman and then as a mom and a grandmother i just -- i can't imagine how anybody could not vote for our president. when you think about what he has done, how much he's accomplished. i said
at its best. the differences that consume us, they seem to melt away. we saw it in california with the fires this summer and the terrible tragedy in aurora. there are no democrats and republicans during a crisis. just fellow americans. [applause] you know, we see leaders of different parties working to fix what is broken. neighbors helping neighbors to cope with tragedy. communities rallying to rebuild. a spirit that says in the end, we are in this together. we rise and fall as one nation. as one people. [applause] in boulder, that spirit has guided this country for more than two centuries. it has carried us through the trials and tribulations of the last four years. we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today, because of the resilience of the american people, our businesses have created 5 million new jobs. the american auto industry is back on top. american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years. we are less dependent on foreign oil than any time in 20 years. home values, home construction is on the rise.
pipeline, particularly in various parts of the country, but i look at california where we have such immense success. two women senators. we have a freight -- great female delegation out there but we also have folks who have been there for 20 years. many are elected 20 years ago. how long are they going to stay? are we prepared for that? that is our next piece and we will be. >> great. this was sort of a perception in some parts of the country this was a good year for women because a couple of men said a couple of dumb things. dawn, is that true? was this about a couple of men saying a couple of dumb things? >> they did say dumb things, let's be clear but this year of the woman part because i think that goes to it i pick up on your analogy, this year women went viral. the same way the media landscape is fractured. i think you could say this was the year of the woman candidate part two. this was the year of the younger woman. this is the year of the diverse woman. this is the year of women's uteruses. it was a lot of different levels of women got involved in a way that i think 20 years ago it
what the impact will be on the national figures in the race for president. california, washington, hawaii have gone for obama, idahoor romney. no big surprises there for people. as you see there with the big vote, the national vote here, mitt romney still showing up here at 2 percentage points ahead of barack obama. right now the eyes of the obama and romney campaigns are watching the fates of their campaigns and the future of the nation, all coming in as each return comes in. abc 7 is your election station tonight. senior political reporter is live at the obama campaign. he's in chicago. let's check in with him. >> we have a long and uncertain night but don't tell that to the cheerers here at obama head quarters in chicago. they are very upbeat as they watch the results come in. particularly when they have seen the numbers come in in pennsylvania, from wisconsin, from new hampshire. they believe that gives them a clear path. they also say senior staff that i talked to early tonight that they read the tea leaves yesterday when they saw mitt romney in ohio. they say that was, quote
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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